Tuesday, July 23, 2024

Turkey Stock for Gravy – Skinnytaste


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There’s no denying that the secret to a memorable turkey gravy lies in its base: a rich, flavorful stock. Once you’ve made your own turkey stock, there’s no going back to the store-bought stuff.

Turkey Stock

Turkey Stock for Gravy

Thanksgiving wouldn’t be complete without the quintessential turkey gravy to drizzle over tender slices of turkey, creamy mashed potatoes, and stuffing. While there are many gravy recipes out there, there’s something special about using a family recipe that’s been passed down through the generations. Today, I’m sharing a treasured recipe from my mom—her signature Turkey Stock for Gravy (gravy recipe coming next). It’s delicious!

Why This Works

  • Meal Prep: I make this turkey stock recipe a week or two ahead and keep it frozen in mason jars. It’s one less thing to do on Thanksgiving Day! 
  • Flavorful: The best stock is a homemade one. Nothing beats the rich taste of stock that’s simmered for hours. It really does make all the difference.
  • Easy: While making stock from scratch when you could buy it from the store may sound complicated, it’s quite simple. All you have to do is throw some turkey, vegetables, and herbs in a pot of water and let it simmer.
  • One Pot: The whole thing is made in one pot!
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turkey stock ingredients

Ingredients

  • Turkey: Use two turkey wings, one turkey drumstick, or the giblets and neck from the turkey.
  • Vegetables: Onion, celery
  • Herbs: Fresh sage and parsley
  • Chicken Bouillon is an easy way to flavor your broth with only one ingredient.

How to Make Turkey Stock

  1. Simmer: Place all the ingredients into a large Dutch oven or pot and fill it to the top with water. Bring it to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low and simmer for four to five hours.
  2. Taste the stock to see if it’s concentrated enough, and add salt. If it doesn’t have enough flavor, continue simmering it.
  3. Strain the Stock: Discard the turkey, bones, and vegetables and strain the stock through a mesh sieve.

What’s the difference between turkey broth and turkey stock?

The main difference is that turkey stock uses bones, and broth doesn’t. Stock simmers for longer and has a richer flavor and darker color than broth.

What is the secret to good gravy?

The secret to a good turkey gravy is using high-quality turkey stock. Generally, homemade stock has better flavor than anything you’ll buy at the supermarket. That’s why I think making turkey stock from scratch is worth the time and effort.

Should you use the skin when making turkey stock?

Yes, the skin adds to the flavor. When making stock, use the bones, skin, and meat. Once simmered, you will discard it. Once the stock is chilled, you can easily remove the fat.

How to Use Turkey Stock

Turkey stock is excellent for gravy, and I use it when I make my mom’s turkey gravy and my flourless gravy. It’s also a wonderful flavor booster for any homemade soup, like this Leftover Turkey Noodle Soup, or Turkey Meatball Vegetable Soup.

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Storage

Cool the liquid to room temperature and then transfer it to storage containers. Refrigerate it for three to four days or freeze it for up to three months. Once cold, remove the fat and discard it.

Turkey Stock Recipe Notes

  • If you prefer a richer stock, you can roast the wings and vegetables first, like I did for this low-carb turkey gravy.
  • This stock is low in salt because I add the salt to the gravy later. If you want to use this for soup, adjust the salt to taste.
  • You can also make this stock with leftover turkey and/or turkey carcass if making this for soup.
Turkey Stock

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Prep: 10 minutes

Cook: 4 hours 30 minutes

cooling time: 30 minutes

Total: 5 hours 10 minutes

Yield: 8 servings

Serving Size: 1 cup

  • Place all the ingredients in a 5 1/2 quart Dutch oven or soup pot and fill with 13 cups water (fill it to the top). Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer on low 4 to 5 hours.

  • After 4 to 5 hours,  taste the stock. If it’s concentrated enough for your liking, add salt to taste (I usually add salt when I make the gravy).

  • Discard the turkey, bones and vegetables and strain the stock through a mesh sieve.

  • Allow the stock to cool to room temperature. Once cooled, transfer it to storage containers (I use 3 large glass mason jars). It can be refrigerated for up to 3-4 days or frozen for up to 3 months. When cold, separate the fat and discard.

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Last Step:

Please leave a rating and comment letting us know how you liked this recipe! This helps our business to thrive and continue providing free, high-quality recipes for you.

This will make about 8 cups.
If you prefer a richer stock, you can roast the wings and vegetables first, like I did for this low-carb turkey gravy.
This stock is low in salt because I add the salt to the gravy later. If you want to use this for soup, feel free to adjust the salt.
You can also make this stock with leftover turkey and/or turkey carcass.

Serving: 1 cup, Calories: 17 kcal, Carbohydrates: 4 g, Protein: 0.5 g, Fat: 0.5 g, Sodium: 158 mg, Fiber: 1 g, Sugar: 2.5 g



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